Seiko 7A38 - by the numbers

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Forum Home > Parts Info, Tech Tips and Tinkering > Today's arrival. 7T32-7F69

Rob Benham
Member
Posts: 281

A tough day.  A/C went out and this time it's not something I can fix.  Just weeks before selling the house.  Anyway, a quick mention of this weighty object.  "Crystal is in great shape."  Well, it's round at least :/  but that's about all you can say for it.  Anyway the dirt just making its way inside looks like soot, in that it's fine.  Probably not having a case-back gasket had something to do with it. :roll:

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Face/dial looks fine and I think the tachy dial is okay as far as I can see through the frosted glass.  But although the bezel rotates, and makes a nice fine clicking noise, I don't know how to get it off.   Hint, hint.  Pushers stiff - one solid. 

I was a bit surprised this one was made in China.  Movement Japan, but China is mentioned which I find tedious.   I thought it would be before that.  044722 is the number.

It will be a while before I have time to work on the fun stuff.  Men here first thing - I hope!  28c and 93% humidity.  Not an environment for watches.


http://www.ebay.com/itm/Seiko-chronograph-alarm-/201037585228


February 25, 2014 at 9:03 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Rob Benham
Member
Posts: 281



A quick update to make things a bit more interesting.  


The bezel seems quite smooth after a few turns.  Do they only turn one way?   I'm being very cautious since it seems locked in the other direction.







The battons are all mirror-like, it's just that they're not shining. 

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The absense of a gasket might or might not be a major issue.  Haven't powered it up yet.



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I assume I have to be very careful of the quartz buzzer.  No dunking, then.





A quick look at the movement seems encouraging, the switches seem clean at a quick glance.    Time will tell.

February 26, 2014 at 12:10 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Rob Benham
Member
Posts: 281

Now this never occured to me.

http://forums.watchuseek.com/f365/how-change-bezel-seiko-skx-diver-photos-263137.html


A bit more professional looking, but of course, ceases to be original. 



February 26, 2014 at 1:33 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Rob Benham
Member
Posts: 281

Strewth!!!!!!!!!   The last pusher is stuck.  I mean really stuck.  I'm supposed to be sleeping, but you know how that goes.  Just one more try at this, or that, or the other. 

I don't dare push at the thin bit of the pusher shaft of course, but I have tried to poke the thick part back.  Nothing, and not surprising.  With every ounce of pressure I can muster with my hands pusing against my bench, I can't put the (now wetted) button in.  The hope was that going the wrong way would at least break the glue and carry some lube into the tube.

I have to get the bezel and tachy ring off now.  Heat is the last thing left to me. 

I've put some WD40 into the cavity around the button and hope that it will capillary into the tube.  It's not going to be enough by itself, so am anticipating having to heat the body of the case.  I don't know if I can get a meaningful amount of freezer on the pusher, but I'll try. 

Worst case, drill it out and fit a new pusher.  A bit drastic, and not really a valuable enough watch to be worth the work. 

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Well, I've spent some time looking, but still don't fully understand the fitting of the bezel.  Has anyone removed this type?  (Just don't understand that link's info above and anyway, it's not exactly that model - just alike enough to trap me.)

February 26, 2014 at 4:05 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Rob Benham
Member
Posts: 281

Watch totally stripped.  Case boiled in water to heat.  Drill press used to apply pressure.  Determination used to poke out again.  Finally button came out without damaging it. 


BTW.  Anyone know why the case back is milled like this?




First stage of cleaning.  You've all seen it before, but could still get a crop of potatos growing in the bezel. 





February 26, 2014 at 4:45 PM Flag Quote & Reply

donwatch
Member
Posts: 568

Rob, your hooked now  :roll:

February 26, 2014 at 5:55 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Rob Benham
Member
Posts: 281

I know!  I wish I'd taken this up years ago.  Got another one arriving monday.  ( 7A38 )

One odd thing:  The crystal - 30 X a chunky 2.78 - was badly marked by lots of circular groves.  The positively polished bevel was inside, with almost no bevel on the outside.

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Concerned obout the smoothness of the tubes in which the pusher stems run, I wasn't tempted to use any metal in them this time.  (did that with my old 7A38-7000 stainless as they were fairly poor - using the drill bit in back to front having roughed the steel with emery.)   This time I used a strong round toothpick in the Dremel.  After initial cleaning, I put some stainless (green) polish on the pick.   Mindful how quickly that polish can strip metal, I carefully took off the build-up and no more . . . for now.  If I can keep me eyes open, I'll check the movement out, though I might wait for the case to be clean as I'm still not satisfied with my kit to hold the movement. 


Oh, no takers on the milling in the back then?   I think I know, but don't want to prompt with my guess.

February 26, 2014 at 9:57 PM Flag Quote & Reply

donwatch
Member
Posts: 568

The case-back milling---This case is made in china--milling hides the first stamping---maybe Pulsar or such

February 26, 2014 at 10:16 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Rob Benham
Member
Posts: 281

Mmmm, a bit brutal.    Having read about tuning bells, I wondered if they improved the case resonance for the alarm should the back prove to be 'dead' or sluggish to resonate.   I don't know, just thought. 


The more I think about it, this watch is now going (with all functions tested except for alarm) but I just can not see the pont in that bezel.  I gathered there are suppliers of after market ones - does the team think it would be an advantage to the value, or not worth the hassle? 

February 27, 2014 at 12:19 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Rob Benham
Member
Posts: 281

I had a moment of panic a while back.  The back seems to slip a long way into the case before the thread catches.  There was no gasket, and I wondered if it was the right back, and hence the right watch!  But the pictures look okay on gooogal. 

The bezel was a pain to clean, but I'm still expending time learning.  Best to do it on a cheap watch. 



Note my cutting board holder.  :D





There was a black substance on the click ring (for want of a better term.)  After soaking all night in pain thinner, it was still hard.  I wondered if it had been some kind of lubricating surface like Teflon that had gone bad.  Anyway, it's had to go because it was incomplete. 


Despite polishing the bezel, I would still like to change it for something more professional looking. 







February 28, 2014 at 2:51 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Rob Benham
Member
Posts: 281

You may be wondering what pain thinner is. :roll:   House paint thinner or white spirit as we used to call it.  Surprisingly, it wasn't as good as Surgical spirit which did a grand job and was okay to the touch.  (I've become allergic to most soap and houshold cleaners in my dotage.)  It's cheap here, but I noticed it's quite costly in the UK.

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The issue of the bevel being on the inside.  Last night, I suddenly realised that there is relative movement between the bevel and the glass.  I suppose it would be counterproductive to have the bevel outwards.

I find the removal of bezels rather stressful and I have to confess to (slightly) marking a case despite trying to keep plastic under the tool.  The garage drill press/pillar drill came into its own again.  I used one of those Stanley scalpels with the yellow plastic handles edge-on under the chuck - having drilled a hole in a chunk of wood to protect the crown stem tube on the opposite edge.  I forced the blade into the gap with a controled progess that I couldn't achieve with a hand tool.  It worked well but is of course only trial number one.

February 28, 2014 at 4:33 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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